Review of Turtles All the Way Down

Friends, first of all, I must say, I love John Green. I love some of his books more than others, but what I like about his writing is that he doesn’t rush his characters. He develops them and the story follows. Often his books aren’t super plot driven, but a study of how characters, many with quirks and oddities, relate to people, themselves, and their environment.

Green’s most well-known work is probably The Fault In Our Stars, which is a good book. This is the book that sparked the ill teenager love story phenomena. (Although, Nicholas Sparks did it way back when…who remembers A Walk to Remember?) However, my favorites of his books are the ones that focus on the nuances of character that many of us have, but aren’t explored as deeply (especially in the Young Adult arena) as Green does in his work. Examples of these include An Abundance of Katherines and Looking for Alaska. I will say that I had heard some buzz online that this was targeted more for an adult audience than a young adult audience, and I did not get that at all. This seemed right in Green’s lane for a young adult book.

Turtles All the Way Down centers on a 16 year-old-girl named Aza who struggles with extreme anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder. The book is somewhat touted as a mystery, and there is a mystery, but it played a distant second fiddle to Aza’s struggle to deal with her own thoughts and participate “normally” in interactions with her friends and in social situations. When I think of this book, I almost forget there was even a mystery at all. What sticks with me, and what I continue to think about is the apt way that Green handles Aza’s crippling anxiety and the care he takes in describing her spiraling thoughts.

Daisy, Aza’s best friend, and Davis, Aza’s love interest, are both strong secondary characters that complement Aza’s journey throughout the narrative.

The mystery in the book centers around Davis’s missing billionaire father, Russell, who has disappeared on the heels of a scandal within his multi-billion dollar company. When a $100,000 reward is offered for information leading to Russell’s whereabouts, Daisy and Aza decide they will try to find him to collect the reward. I waited to mention this here, because to me, this is the least interesting part of this story.

What I appreciate so, so much is the time that John Green takes to develop his characters. Aza is one of my favorite characters I have ever encountered. She has had a traumatic experience in her life that contributes to the manifestation of her anxiety. The deft handling of the events in the story, and just the way that Aza tries to fight something that the people in her life don’t understand, equals a character that I cannot forget.

What John Green brings to light in the pages of this book is that often, anxiety, depression, and mental illness as a whole are hard for people who are not experiencing these things to understand. However, it is very real to the person who is experiencing it. This is what Turtles All the Way Down relays so well. Aza provides a lense through which the reader can experience what it is like to be in this mental space. It is why I continue to think about Aza long after finishing the book.

If you can’t tell, I really loved this book. Green’s work isn’t for everyone. If you are a reader who loves a nice neat ending, Turtles All the Way Down probably won’t be a satisfying read for you. This aspect is what I love about John Green, but I know not everyone likes endings like these.

Bottom Line: For me, this is a 5/5. There is some language (Daisy has a potty-mouth.) and some alluding to sex, so I would be careful putting it in the lower middle grades. I think this would be a great read for high school students.

Review: Mr. Dickens and His Carol

Thank you to Flatiron Books for my free copy of Mr. Dickens and His Carol in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.

Samantha Silva’s Mr. Dicken’s and His Carol is a delightful imagining of how Charles Dicken’s  iconic Christmas classic came to be. The story follows Dickens in the weeks before Christmas as he struggles to write a Christmas themed story to satisfy his publishers who are dismayed at the dwindling sales of his latest book. As the pressure mounts to meet the Christmas deadline, a cast of recognizable, yet not quite totally familiar characters provide inspiration and at times trepidation for Dickens.

I thoroughly enjoyed this charming novel. A Christmas Carol is one of my favorite fictional Christmas stories. (The Gift of the Magi is my other one!) Samantha Silva’s portrayal of the Christmastime streets of London during 1800s is magical. She writes, “The air smelled like it had hailed nutmeg and snowed cinnamon.” Be still my heart. Her skill in transporting me from December 2017 in the rural U.S. to the London streets of Dickens’s time is considerable. The smells, the sights–all of the sensory details assist in creating this lovely setting.

While the well-crafted setting is my favorite part of the novel, I also loved Silva’s Dickens. Presented as a lovable, but flawed family man somewhat jaded by success and struggling to accept his floundering popularity, Dickens is at times endearing, and at times completely and utterly frustrating. This character choice provides for compelling interactions with supporting characters in the novel.

The plot is interesting and familiar, yet not (You will understand this if you read the book.); however, the strength of the book lies in the author’s ability to capture a time period and pay tribute to one of the most popular Christmas stories ever written. I so love all the wink, wink, nudge, nudge moments to A Christmas Carol that transpire as the novel progresses.

Another passage from the book that I would be remiss not to mention is as follows:

“The distance between him (Dickens) and Catherine (Dicken’s wife), as in all marriages, was sometimes an inch, but other times the great expanse between hill and valley, ocean and desert. It was Dante’s dark forest, shrouded in shadow, the right path so often obscured. It was being together but feeling alone.”

Silva is so adept with creating a moment that although the setting is in a time much earlier, the words and feelings are timeless. And this is why I enjoyed this novel.

Bottom Line: 4/5 This is a lovely period piece set at my favorite time of the year. What is not to love? However, a reader who must have a fast-paced plot to enjoy a book will probably want to skip this one.