Review of The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid is a novel that was not on my radar until it showed up as a Book of the Month pick (before I was a member) and SO many bookstagrammers started posting about it. I read this as a buddy read with one of my book buddies–Priscilla of @2.ps.in.a.bookstagram.

This novel centers around Evelyn Hugo, a starlet whose fame and acquirement of husbands (a la Elizabeth Taylor) rose to astronomical proportions in the 50s and 60s. The book starts in present day with a reporter, Monique, from a fictional magazine coming to interview Evelyn about her life. Most of the story is Evelyn telling Monique about her life. I loved the format of the book. Sections are divided by the names of Evelyn’s seven husbands. At first glance, this may seem like a frothy, light read about an aging celebrity. (Which is what I though going in) Trust me, it is not. This book examines the role and treatment of a female in Hollywood during this time period, and the lengths actresses went to to find success and fame. In addition, it really examines the many forms love takes as well as the importance of the legacy we leave behind.

This novel is definitely not at all what I expected it to be. It delved into places that I did not anticipate. Typically, I shy away from books that center on celebrity or celebrity life, which is odd because I enjoy reading about real celebrities in magazines like People. But, for some reason, reading about fictional celebrities is not something I seek out.  What I love about this novel is that while it does have a lot to do with Evelyn’s thirst for fame, it also has a lost of human elements in it too. In addition, the narrative seems really timely in light of the current sexual misconduct scandal in Hollywood which began with the outing of Harvey Weinstein’s alleged misconduct. After reading Taylor Jenkins Reid’s version of Evelyn’s life in the 50s and 60s, the question that begs an answer is, “Have we really come that far?” I fear the answer is no, and that is utterly depressing.

Taylor Jenkins Reid’s approach to this narrative is unique and well-done. For me, a slow reader, this went by quickly, and I felt all the feelings. At certain points in the story, I sobbed. But it was, oh so good.

Bottom Line:I really enjoyed this book. It would be a fantastic choice for a book club read, because there is just so much to discuss. Loved this one! 5/5