Review of The Wife Between Us

Thank you to St. Martin’s Press for my advanced copy of The Wife Between US in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.

I am a sucker for a good twisty suspense book. When Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn was all the rage, I literally had it in the passenger’s seat of my car to read at red lights. (Sorry to all the drivers circa Fall 2012 that had to honk their horns to get me to move when the light turned green.) Since the Gone Girl craze, there have been A LOT of read alikes that have been published with a similar premise with similar twists. I am not so fond of the read alike. I just feel like it never lives up to the original.

At first glance, I thought that The Wife Between Us might be a read alike, and I was nervous. (Luckily, that was not the case!) The book begins in alternating chapters between Nellie, a hopeful young preschool teacher engaged to the older, wealthy, distinguished Richard, and Vanessa, Richard’s bitter ex-wife with a drinking problem. (At the beginning of this novel, I worried that the authors were going to borrow from The Girl on the Train with Vanessa’s affinity toward wine, but thankfully, that did not happen.) As the narrative progresses, we get to know each of these women’s motivations and histories.

As with many suspense novels, I hesitate to summarize too much, because I do not want to give any spoilers. (There is no fun in that!)

Parts of The Wife Between Us are brilliant. There was one twist I never saw coming. When I read it, I literally stopped and sat in my big cozy chair, and said to myself, What the…, then I went back and re-read the preceding chapters.

I would give the first half of the book five stars. It is that good. I read a lot of suspense, and the first twist in the book was hall of fame level. However, in the last half of the book, the narrative falls apart a bit. Because the first half of the book is so good, and there is a big pay-off (twist) midway through, the rest of the book struggles to keep up.

Toward the end of the book, there are a few plot choices that feel very contrived. Particularly the appearance of an aforementioned irrelevant character who ends up having a substantial role in the resolution.  b\But I must admit, I this book was a page turner, and even with its weaker plot points, at the end I felt pretty satisfied with the resolution.

I think this book would be an excellent beach read. So, if you haven’t read it, maybe wait until summer vacation to pick it up. It is the perfect read for that moment when your toes are buried in the warm sand, a cold margarita in one hand, and an intriguing page-turner in the other.

For a debut suspense novel, I say bravo to Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen. If you read this book, I would love to discuss it with you. (Suspense books lead to a pretty sparse review, because I am so hesitant to discuss too much for fear of spoiling!) Leave a comment or come find me on Instagram (@meaningfulmadness)!

Bottom Line: I give this a solid 3.5 stars. I liked it, and it definitely kept me interested. The front half is stellar, but the back half is not. That being said, it is definitely worth a read if just for the first twist.

Review of Turtles All the Way Down

Friends, first of all, I must say, I love John Green. I love some of his books more than others, but what I like about his writing is that he doesn’t rush his characters. He develops them and the story follows. Often his books aren’t super plot driven, but a study of how characters, many with quirks and oddities, relate to people, themselves, and their environment.

Green’s most well-known work is probably The Fault In Our Stars, which is a good book. This is the book that sparked the ill teenager love story phenomena. (Although, Nicholas Sparks did it way back when…who remembers A Walk to Remember?) However, my favorites of his books are the ones that focus on the nuances of character that many of us have, but aren’t explored as deeply (especially in the Young Adult arena) as Green does in his work. Examples of these include An Abundance of Katherines and Looking for Alaska. I will say that I had heard some buzz online that this was targeted more for an adult audience than a young adult audience, and I did not get that at all. This seemed right in Green’s lane for a young adult book.

Turtles All the Way Down centers on a 16 year-old-girl named Aza who struggles with extreme anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder. The book is somewhat touted as a mystery, and there is a mystery, but it played a distant second fiddle to Aza’s struggle to deal with her own thoughts and participate “normally” in interactions with her friends and in social situations. When I think of this book, I almost forget there was even a mystery at all. What sticks with me, and what I continue to think about is the apt way that Green handles Aza’s crippling anxiety and the care he takes in describing her spiraling thoughts.

Daisy, Aza’s best friend, and Davis, Aza’s love interest, are both strong secondary characters that complement Aza’s journey throughout the narrative.

The mystery in the book centers around Davis’s missing billionaire father, Russell, who has disappeared on the heels of a scandal within his multi-billion dollar company. When a $100,000 reward is offered for information leading to Russell’s whereabouts, Daisy and Aza decide they will try to find him to collect the reward. I waited to mention this here, because to me, this is the least interesting part of this story.

What I appreciate so, so much is the time that John Green takes to develop his characters. Aza is one of my favorite characters I have ever encountered. She has had a traumatic experience in her life that contributes to the manifestation of her anxiety. The deft handling of the events in the story, and just the way that Aza tries to fight something that the people in her life don’t understand, equals a character that I cannot forget.

What John Green brings to light in the pages of this book is that often, anxiety, depression, and mental illness as a whole are hard for people who are not experiencing these things to understand. However, it is very real to the person who is experiencing it. This is what Turtles All the Way Down relays so well. Aza provides a lense through which the reader can experience what it is like to be in this mental space. It is why I continue to think about Aza long after finishing the book.

If you can’t tell, I really loved this book. Green’s work isn’t for everyone. If you are a reader who loves a nice neat ending, Turtles All the Way Down probably won’t be a satisfying read for you. This aspect is what I love about John Green, but I know not everyone likes endings like these.

Bottom Line: For me, this is a 5/5. There is some language (Daisy has a potty-mouth.) and some alluding to sex, so I would be careful putting it in the lower middle grades. I think this would be a great read for high school students.

Review: Mr. Dickens and His Carol

Thank you to Flatiron Books for my free copy of Mr. Dickens and His Carol in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.

Samantha Silva’s Mr. Dicken’s and His Carol is a delightful imagining of how Charles Dicken’s  iconic Christmas classic came to be. The story follows Dickens in the weeks before Christmas as he struggles to write a Christmas themed story to satisfy his publishers who are dismayed at the dwindling sales of his latest book. As the pressure mounts to meet the Christmas deadline, a cast of recognizable, yet not quite totally familiar characters provide inspiration and at times trepidation for Dickens.

I thoroughly enjoyed this charming novel. A Christmas Carol is one of my favorite fictional Christmas stories. (The Gift of the Magi is my other one!) Samantha Silva’s portrayal of the Christmastime streets of London during 1800s is magical. She writes, “The air smelled like it had hailed nutmeg and snowed cinnamon.” Be still my heart. Her skill in transporting me from December 2017 in the rural U.S. to the London streets of Dickens’s time is considerable. The smells, the sights–all of the sensory details assist in creating this lovely setting.

While the well-crafted setting is my favorite part of the novel, I also loved Silva’s Dickens. Presented as a lovable, but flawed family man somewhat jaded by success and struggling to accept his floundering popularity, Dickens is at times endearing, and at times completely and utterly frustrating. This character choice provides for compelling interactions with supporting characters in the novel.

The plot is interesting and familiar, yet not (You will understand this if you read the book.); however, the strength of the book lies in the author’s ability to capture a time period and pay tribute to one of the most popular Christmas stories ever written. I so love all the wink, wink, nudge, nudge moments to A Christmas Carol that transpire as the novel progresses.

Another passage from the book that I would be remiss not to mention is as follows:

“The distance between him (Dickens) and Catherine (Dicken’s wife), as in all marriages, was sometimes an inch, but other times the great expanse between hill and valley, ocean and desert. It was Dante’s dark forest, shrouded in shadow, the right path so often obscured. It was being together but feeling alone.”

Silva is so adept with creating a moment that although the setting is in a time much earlier, the words and feelings are timeless. And this is why I enjoyed this novel.

Bottom Line: 4/5 This is a lovely period piece set at my favorite time of the year. What is not to love? However, a reader who must have a fast-paced plot to enjoy a book will probably want to skip this one.

Review of The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid is a novel that was not on my radar until it showed up as a Book of the Month pick (before I was a member) and SO many bookstagrammers started posting about it. I read this as a buddy read with one of my book buddies–Priscilla of @2.ps.in.a.bookstagram.

This novel centers around Evelyn Hugo, a starlet whose fame and acquirement of husbands (a la Elizabeth Taylor) rose to astronomical proportions in the 50s and 60s. The book starts in present day with a reporter, Monique, from a fictional magazine coming to interview Evelyn about her life. Most of the story is Evelyn telling Monique about her life. I loved the format of the book. Sections are divided by the names of Evelyn’s seven husbands. At first glance, this may seem like a frothy, light read about an aging celebrity. (Which is what I though going in) Trust me, it is not. This book examines the role and treatment of a female in Hollywood during this time period, and the lengths actresses went to to find success and fame. In addition, it really examines the many forms love takes as well as the importance of the legacy we leave behind.

This novel is definitely not at all what I expected it to be. It delved into places that I did not anticipate. Typically, I shy away from books that center on celebrity or celebrity life, which is odd because I enjoy reading about real celebrities in magazines like People. But, for some reason, reading about fictional celebrities is not something I seek out.  What I love about this novel is that while it does have a lot to do with Evelyn’s thirst for fame, it also has a lost of human elements in it too. In addition, the narrative seems really timely in light of the current sexual misconduct scandal in Hollywood which began with the outing of Harvey Weinstein’s alleged misconduct. After reading Taylor Jenkins Reid’s version of Evelyn’s life in the 50s and 60s, the question that begs an answer is, “Have we really come that far?” I fear the answer is no, and that is utterly depressing.

Taylor Jenkins Reid’s approach to this narrative is unique and well-done. For me, a slow reader, this went by quickly, and I felt all the feelings. At certain points in the story, I sobbed. But it was, oh so good.

Bottom Line:I really enjoyed this book. It would be a fantastic choice for a book club read, because there is just so much to discuss. Loved this one! 5/5

Review of Devils & Thieves

Thanks to Kid Lit Exchange network for this review copy of Devils & Thieves. All opinions are my own.

Devils & Thieves is a YA fantasy about kindleds, people who have magical abilities, who are also in motorcycle gangs. Sort of like the older version of the Harry Potter kids with magic but without the wands joins Sons of Anarchy-lite. Sort of. I know this sounds strange. (It felt a little gimmicky and arbitrary to me.)

Here’s the premise. Jemmie Carmichael is the eighteen-year-old protagonist of this novel. She is a kindled who does not know how to use her magic to its full potential. She is best friends with Alex, whose brother Crowe is the leader of the Black Devils the motorcycle gang that Jemmie’s family has been associated with in the past. In addition, Jemmie has a spotty past with Crowe which causes her significant angst. As the novel progresses, the Black Devils get ready for a festival where rival gangs roll into town and conflict ensues.

This book is standard fare for soapy YA novels with magical beings. (Disclaimer: I love soapy YA novels with an element of magic. Yes, please!) Honestly, in the opening chapters I was ready to put the book down. These chapters were ineffective and disjointed in explaining this unknown world. When I read fantasy like this, I like the setting and the main aspects of the magical world to be clearly explained at the beginning so I can construct the world in my mind. These beginning chapters did not do this–the magical world felt muddled and confusing. I almost abandoned the book altogether.

Devils & Thieves does get more interesting in later chapters. I enjoyed the overarching story, although there is nothing new or inventive in the narrative as it unfolds. It feels pretty formulaic and surface. The characters have little depth, even though it feels like the author is attempting to give them depth with common plot points such as avenging a loved one’s death and battling personal demons. None of these attempts land particularly well, and thus I felt disconnected from the characters.

In terms of sheer entertainment value, this book isn’t bad. I did find myself wanting to keep reading. I also enjoyed the way the magical element is presented in the story. The magic is divided into different classifications with kindleds only being able to naturally perform a particular type of magic. However, they can create ‘cuts’ they can share and/or sell that will allow another kindled to perform bits of magic that is not his or her own. The most complicated element of this book is the magic, because of all the different types with unfamiliar names. I found myself having to look back in the book to reread to remind myself which magical name went which classification.

This is not a ground-breaking YA book, but it is okay. The audience it is intended for will likely eat it up. Crowe, Jemmie’s male counterpart, is mysterious, sexy, and damaged, which creates all kinds of angst that will delight the audience for this book.

One more note about Devils & Thieves: It has a lot of profanity and underaged drinking in it. At times, both feel gratuitous and excessive. So, if you are a teacher or a parent be aware of this. The book is fine for high school, but it would be a complete judgement call for middle school.

Bottom line: For me as a grown-up, I give it a 2/5. Looking through the lens of the YA crowd, I would bump my rating to 2.5/5. There is better YA out there, but I think there is an audience for this book, especially those who enjoyed books like Twilight and the read alikes it inspired.